Airbnb Host Creates Petition To Confront New York Lawmakers

The median estimate in a Bloomberg survey of economists called for a reading of 7. The gauge dropped even as orders climbed to the highest level in seven months, indicating production will probably pick up next month. The budget and debt-ceiling standoff in Washington may have shaken confidence within manufacturing, which makes up about 12 percent of the economy. A lot of manufacturers uncertainty can be blamed on the fiscal brinkmanship, rather than a deterioration in fundamentals, said Ryan Sweet , a senior economist at Moodys Analytics Inc. in West Chester , Pennsylvania, who projected the index would drop to 1. The improvement in new orders is reason for optimism. Stock futures were little changed, after a four-day rally took the Standard & Poors 500 Index to a three-week high, as investors weighed budget-talk developments. The contract on the S&P 500 maturing in December dropped less than 0.1 percent to 1,703 at 8:55 a.m. in New York. Survey Results Octobers estimates for the so-called Empire State index in the Bloomberg survey of 51 economists ranged from minus 2 to 10. The headline reading is a separate question rather than a compilation of subcomponents and is therefore sometimes considered a gauge of underlying sentiment. The measure of new orders increased in October to 7.8, the highest since March, from 2.4 the previous month. A gauge of shipments declined to 13.1 from a 16-month high of 16.4 in September. Factory managers said inventories were little changed this month after climbing in September for the first time in more than a year. Stronger orders and weaker inventories is not exactly a bad combination for the production outlook, Neil Dutta, head of U.S.

Capital New York Hires Three Columnists As Relaunch Nears

The 49-year-old native of Libya is accused of playing a role in the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania. The United States had been holding him aboard a Navy ship, U.S. officials said. He was questioned there by members of a high-value detainee interrogation team, the officials said. American officials have described him as “one of the world’s most wanted terrorists.” He was indicted in 2001 by the federal court in the Southern District of New York in the embassy bombings and in connection with his alleged roles in al Qaeda conspiracies to attack U.S. forces in Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Somalia. Some terrorism experts have questioned how much valuable intelligence al Libi would be able to provide for his captors. A former jihadist associate told CNN last week that it was unlikely that he was still playing an active role with the terrorist network. His wife said he was no longer a member of al Qaeda, had been living a normal life and was seeking a job with the Libyan oil ministry. Al Libi was captured October 5 on the street in front of his home as he returned in his car from morning prayers. President Barack Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder have previously said they prefer to try individuals such as al Libi in American courts. Trying such suspects on American soil has been a controversial topic in the past. In 2009, Holder said five detainees with alleged ties to the September 11, 2001, attacks would be transferred from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to New York for trial in civilian court. Later Holder reversed course, announcing that accused 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and others would be tried in a military commission at Guantanamo instead.

U.S. Market Should Be Part of a Portfolio: Shiller

The rent-out-your-home service has thrown its weight behind a petition authored by a New York City host named Mishelle. In the petition, she asks the state’s senate to fix what she calls a “poorly written law,” which could curb Airbnb’s reach in the region. “The reason this is happening is because of a poorly written law originally designed to stop slumlords from running illegal hotels with dozens of rental apartments,” Mishelle writes. “As a New Yorker just trying to pay my bills, I don’t understand why they think I’m a slumlord.” “I figure that if we get 20,000 people to sign the petition, we’ll get the state Senate’s attention,” she continues. “If we hit that goal by October 20th, I pledge to deliver the signatures to every senator myself.” As of this writing the petition has surpassed 20,000 signatures, the majority of which were gathered within the last 24 hours. Airbnb also got behind the petition on Monday by sending out an e-mail to its thousands of New York members. “The New York attorney general has subpoenaed the records of almost all of our New York hosts,” Airbnb’s global head of community Douglas Atkin wrote in the e-mail. “We are fighting the subpoena with all we’ve got, but poorly written laws make for even worse enforcement, and unless you help to stop it once and for all, the laws may never get better and New Yorkers will continue to suffer.” The debacle between New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and Airbnb has been ongoing over the past year, but it got heated when Schneiderman filed a subpoena earlier this month. The subpoena requests three years’ worth of data on thousands of Airbnb New York hosts. Airbnb has said that it has 225,000 community members in New York. The Attorney General’s office is specifically looking for data on 15,000 hosts — it’s unclear if this includes almost all of Airbnb’s New York hosts.

‘Humans of New York’ fascinate photographer Brandon Stanton

humans of new york

Love. They pretty much demonstrate the whole range of human emotion.” Brandon Stanton “He’s going to be a player.” Brandon Stanton “Bet it’??d be hard to have a bad day if you were holding hands with these two.” Brandon Stanton “While surveying hurricane damage on Staten Island, I came across these volunteers from the Muslim-American Society. They paused for a quick picture before heading back to their car for more supplies.” Brandon Stanton “These two were raising money for the boya?’s athletic league. ‘It’s a great program,’ explained the father. ‘I found it while searching for things he could do.'” Brandon Stanton The photographer becomes the subject. John Berube Like this topic? You may also like these photo galleries: Replay Last Slide Next Slide Blog becomes a book filled with New Yorkers of every stripe. Brandon Stanton explores the ‘Humans of New York’ in his blog, which is being published as a book. Story Highlights His new book of photos grew from his blog He interviews his subjects throughout the city “Storytelling” as important as the photography SHARE 78 CONNECT 28 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE It’s a gloomy day in New York, not great for taking pictures, and photographer Brandon Stanton is at home in Brooklyn. But not for long. When it gets dark, he says, he’ll take out his camera he doesn’t use a flash and go looking for “pockets of light” or well-lit streets and see what he finds. The random anonymous people (and occasional dog) he snaps will join his voluminous collection, Humans of New York, an ongoing blog and now a book (St. Martin’s Press, on sale Tuesday).

Now that Capital is close to filling up its reporter ranks on the politics and media desks, editors are lining up several weekly city columnists for the site’s early November relaunch. Capital’s first three columnists will be Jim Windolf, a Vanity Fair contributing editor who has written for several publications and started the New York Observer’s “New York World” column; Joanna Molloy, a veteran Daily News gossip writer and co-author of a new book on the subject; and Glynnis MacNicol, a writer and co-founder of TheLi.st and former media editor at Business Insider and Mediaite. The model will be more Jimmy Breslin than Joe Scarborough. While Politico columnists, like Scarborough or National Review editor Rich Lowry, comment on political and policy debates, Capital’s writers will produce reported columns that also express a point of view. They’ll draw from the city columnist tradition that extends from tabloid muckraking, a la Breslin, to the New York Times’ Clyde Haberman. Capital co-editor Tom McGeveran told HuffPost the new columns will focus on “New York issues, New York personalities and New York places.” “This is a tradition in which the best columns always entertain,” McGeveran said. “Sometimes they even change the minds of the city’s big decision makers; better yet is when a columnist changes their plans.” The new columnists are not joining full-time, but will write weekly for the site. However, Capital has been filling up the newsroom with full-time reporters and editors since Politico purchased the three-year-old site in September. On the politics front, Capital’s hired Daily News veteran Joanne Wasserman , the Albany Times Union’s Jimmy Vielkind , the New York Post’s Sally Goldenberg . Capital media reporter Joe Pompeo will now be joined on the desk by several additional reporters, including TV Newser’s Alex Weprin, Women’s Wear Daily’s Matthew Lynch, former Newsday and Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Nicole Levy, and World Policy Journal’s Johana Bhuiyan. In addition, Peter Sterne will cover media part-time for the site while finishing at Columbia University.